Can Cats Eat Pistachios

Can Cats Eat Pistachios – Weird Facts Your Probably Didn’t Know

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest

Cats are adorable pets, and to most pet owners, cats are their best friends. But have you ever wondered what some of the foods could do to your cat? Do you know the type of foods that you can safely share with your feline companion? You definitely want your cat to eat the best kinds of foods to meet all her nutrition needs. You must have heard about Pistachio and the many myths surrounding it in regards to health concerns. As much as you’re tempted to give these nuts to your kitty, remember it’s prudent to have the right information.

Pistachios are not very poisonous to cats, but like all nuts, they contain different fat levels, which can pose some mild health issues such as gastrointestinal upset. The nuts also contain a lot of salt that is not good for your cat’s overall health. Worse still, nuts and their shells are a choking risk for your beloved furry friend.

Should I give Pistachio to my cat?

Yes, but always keep in mind there are risks involved. To be safe, keep your kitty away from pistachios and other nuts. If it’s unavoidable, ensure you only feed the cat small quantities of the pistachios and do so under your watch. Do not take your eyes off your cat when she’s eating pistachios or any other nuts. Though not fatal, large quantities of pistachios fed to a cat might cause health complications.

Common cat health risks of consuming Pistachios

Although humans can consume pistachios in large quantities, they have opposite health effects to cats. This clearly shows that pistachios are not as beneficial health-wise to your cats. Here are common health hazards of giving pistachios to your cats;

Artificial Flavouring ingredients

Pistachios come in a whole variety of flavors, including onions flavor, Garlic Flavour, and Salted. They essentially contain many artificial ingredients and coloring agents that can pose a health risk for your car. Humans might enjoy these flavors, but some of them, especially garlic and onion, can be fatal to cats. Some packagers add a lot of salt that is equally dangerous to cats and other animals. Remember, garlic and onions are considered toxic to cats.

Choking risk

Feeding your cat with nuts and especially pistachios and their shells, increases the risk of choking. The fruit seeds and the shells mainly cause the foreign body obstruction. The nuts can get stuck in the intestinal tract and end up being a life-threatening encounter for your kitty. Needless to say, this will cause a lot of pain and discomfort to the pet. It’s actually a serious condition that may need surgery to remove the foreign body and free the cat from immense pain.

Gastrointestinal risks

This is a common risk of giving your cat pistachios and other types of nuts that are artificially packaged. If consumed in large quantities, they cause gastrointestinal distress and pain. Nuts are hard to digest for such an animal’s digestive system, and this often results in extreme bloating and gas. The end result is pain and discomfort. Even humans encounter cases of bloating, gas and indigestion if they excessively consume nuts. Carnivorous animals like cats will obviously have a hard time digesting most of these nuts.

Risk of Pancreatitis

Pistachios are high in fat and dietary fibre. Fat might be a good source of energy, but high-fat levels can be fatal and increase pancreatitis risk. Too much fat can potentially lead to obesity and an increased risk of weight-related complications. The greatest of all weight risks is pancreatitis. This refers to a complication where the pancreas is inflamed. It happens when the pancreas doesn’t function perfectly fine to release its digestive juices. The juice will essentially attack the organ and start to digest it, leading to serious inflammation. If not controlled, you will notice that your cat struggles with abdominal pain, nausea, and changes in the stool. This condition is life-threatening and often causes death.

Risks of Fungus

Overconsumption of nuts and specific, Pistachios can cause Aspergillus fungus, which aggravates liver failure. The fungus might as well produce toxins that cause aflatoxins toxicosis in cats. This complication’s common symptoms are Lethargy, Seizures, weakness, yellow mucous membranes, loss of appetite, and Bloody diarrhea.

FAQs

Are Pistachios harmful to cats?

Yes, Pistachios are very likely to cause stomach upsets and pancreatitis if ingested in large amounts. Even more, when ingested with the shell on, it can result in obstruction in the cat’s intestines.

Can animals eat Pistachios?

No, all animals are not supposed to ingest the pistachio nuts in large quantities. This doesn’t mean that they should ingest them at all. But small quantities are very unlikely to cause any type of health complication. When pistachio shells are ingested, they present a choking hazard to many pets.

Why are pistachios very expensive?

Pistachios are expensive because the supply for these nuts is lower than the demand. There’s no enough rainwater and snowfall for the high temperatures. Simply put, Pistachios use a lot of water to grow, and as the water levels go down, it will automatically become very expensive for the farmers to grow them.

What foods are dangerous to cats?

There are a couple of foods that cats shouldn’t consume in large quantities. Pistachios, Onions, Garlic, Grapes, Alcohol, and Chocolate are not very harmful to cats when consumed in small quantities. Still, they can definitely lead to a couple of health issues when consumed in large quantities.

Conclusion

Pistachios may not kill your cats if consumed in low quantities. But there’s a risk of liver and pancreas failure if the quantity is increased. To be safe, I would automatically advise you to avoid Pistachios with your cats and other pets. Pistachios usually have salt, garlic, and onion flavors, which are equally fatal to our cats. Try feeding your cat other healthier and safer foods.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This litter box ACTUALLY cleans itselfRead More